Oak columns in the logia at Sullingstead House.

Listed buildings

There is a huge amount of common ground between work on listed buildings, conservation work and extensions.  Despite this overlap, projects in this category are more often a team effort including planners and heritage architects.  Careful design is a key factor of successful projects. 

Many planners favour plans that complement the existing building but which remain architecturally distinct from the house's period features.  In other cases, a Douglas fir or oak frame can be used to provide structural support, enabling 'crumbling' walls to be retained for the future.


Our approach to these projects combines a thorough knowledge of historic building methods with contemporary design and traditional carpentry.

  • The new porch at Wells Cathedral.
    Wells Cathedral

    We designed and built the spire for this new “porch” to Wells Cathedral. This is definitely the only time we have seen a client recruit archeologists to dig the foundations, and the whole project was closely overseen by English Heritage and a number of other interested parties. Interestingly, despite the emphasis on ancient architecture this would have been impossible to realise without the help of Computer Aided Design, allowing us to resolve curves intersecting in three dimensions.

  • Oak framed garden room extension of a listed building.
    Inside-outside space.

    This is the same project we showed in garden rooms. The new oak framed extension is glazed on three sides with an open sided end bay, offering an all weather ‘inside-outside’ space. Not only was this an extension to a listed building, but the conservation officer was so pleased with it that he nominated this project for an award!

  • Round oak framed extension to a thatched listed building.
    Modern extension to a period building

    This oak framed extension to a listed building was very popular with the planners. They particularly liked the difference in style between the new extension and the original building.

  • Oak framed dining room.
    Timber framing used to support older walls.

    This refurbishment and conversion of an old barn uses traditional materials to preserve an ancient cob wall. The new timber frame provides structural support, allowing the old walls to remain in the finished building.

  • Oak framed bathroom in a listed cob farmhouse.
    Listed cob farmhouse

    This restoration and extension project, again uses oak framing to provide structural support to ancient cob walls.